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Fueled by Girl Power: Brian Smale’s latest people photography

Three portraits in black and white of teenage girls having fun; people photography by Brian Smale
Three portraits in black and white of teenage girls having fun; people photography by Brian Smale
Three portraits in black and white of teenage girls having fun; people photography by Brian Smale

Photographer Brian Smale has roamed the planet capturing people photography for clients as diverse as Panasonic, USAA and Microsoft. But his latest project kept him right in his own community.

Two black and white portraits of girl and teacher being silly with science equipment; people photography by Brian Smale
Two black and white portraits of girl and teacher being silly with science equipment; people photography by Brian Smale

“My daughter’s school is hosting their annual fundraiser and asked if I’d do some portraits of some of the girls and teachers for the event,” explains Brian. “I get creative freedom, they get free,” he laughs. What started out as a small portrait project grew under Brian’s direction to 12 foot high posters of the girls doing what they do best – being themselves.

Two black and white portraits of teenage girls looking happy and confident; people photography by Brian Smale
Two black and white portraits of teenage girls looking happy and confident; people photography by Brian Smale

Brian added the photoshop ‘cutout’ filter to make the portraits more representational of the student body as a whole. “Plus,” he adds, “at 12 feet high with zero budget, going to simplified images with just 3 or 4 tones was a no-brainer.”

Three black and white portraits of girls and a teacher having fun with pencils, leaves and hula hoops; people photography by Brian Smale
3Three black and white portraits of girls and a teacher having fun with pencils, leaves and hula hoops; people photography by Brian Smale
Three black and white portraits of girls and a teacher having fun with pencils, leaves and hula hoops; people photography by Brian Smale

Having spent a career shooting portraits of luminaries, gangsters, Nazis and politicians, Brian isn’t phased by much. Still, facing off with a gaggle of teen age girls, “I was terrified, of course!,” he says. “But they were such a nice bunch.”

Two black and white portraits of teenage girls looking capable and confident; people photography by Brian Smale
Two black and white portraits of teenage girls looking capable and confident; people photography by Brian Smale

The focus of the all-girls school is building leadership, independence and confidence, so Brian wanted to make sure those values were reflected in the photos. “And,” he adds, “I wanted the girls to have fun.” Check and check. You can see more of Brian’s wide range of commercial people and places photography here.

   

Graphic Designer Filip Yip
revs brand engines.

Dynamic illustration of a red white and blue racecar for Kingsford by graphic designer Filip Yip

Americans love our cars, and brands know it. Graphic designer and illustrator Filip Yip helps those brands connect with their audience, creating car graphics that speak to people’s lifestyles and loyalties. “I do love cars, but not in that car-guy kind of way,” says Filip. “To me, cars represent where you are in life, what your needs and dreams are at that moment.”

Charming illustration of two animals driving down a Sierra County foothills road by graphic designer Filip Yip
Energetic graphic depiction of the black Havoline racecar by graphic designer Filip Yip
 

Filip has conjured powerful racecars for companies like Kingsford and Havoline and cars with throwback charm for Eddie’s Premium Salsa and Sierra County Chamber of Commerce, along with many more. “With cars, and really all brand design, you’re trying to create a shared experience between the brand and the viewer. That’s where my process starts,” Filip says.

An old-timey blue delivery van by graphic designer Filip Yip

The relationship between company and consumer is one Filip takes very seriously. A decade into his successful design career, he took it upon himself to earn his MBA so he could fully partner with his clients on their strategic communications efforts.

Illustration of a farm truck for a salsa packaging client by graphic designer Filip Yip

Some may not immediately see the connection between Filip’s hard driving business instincts and his inspirational idols Van Gogh, Matisse and Gauguin, but for Filip, that’s the power of design and visual communication. “I try to create something authentic and emotional every time because those are the building blocks of strong branding,” he says.

Iconic illustration of one of London’s double decker buses by graphic designer Filip Yip

With clients from Anheuser Busch to FedEx to EBay to Clif Bar, Filip’s vast portfolio reaches far beyond driving machines. Check out his cowboys, monkeys, schooners, skyscrapers and much more here.

Logo of an Airstream trailer for Austin Food Trailer Week by graphic designer Filip Yip    

Eric Frazier’s portrait photography makes work look like fun.

A woman jumps through the air wearing a blue cape in an office setting; portrait photography by Eric Frazier

“Stuffy corporate headshots are going the way of car phones and retirement watches,” says photographer Eric Frazier about portrait photography. Modern companies use employee photos both as a brand tool and a recruitment tool, luring clients and applicants with energetic, highly personal portraits.

A woman rides a bike down an office hallway; portrait photography by Eric Frazier

Eric recently shot a series of portraits for NicholsBooth Architects – a San Francisco firm that prides themselves on truly listening and responding to clients. They wanted to make sure their team photos supported the same message.

A woman smiles at the camera with Scrabble board graphics on the wall behind her; portrait photography by Eric Frazier
The feet of the woman in the previous photograph – she is balancing on one leg; portrait photography by Eric Frazier

In addition to the requisite individual portraits on the website, the rollover state of each one showcases the person’s favorite shoes. “We shoot all over the office, trying to capture each person in a way that makes you feel you’re really getting to know them,” says Eric.

A man sits on a couch, smiling and wearing a gold dollar-sign necklace; portrait photography by Eric Frazier
The feet of the man in the previous photograph. His feet are up in the air with his shoes resting on top of them; portrait photography by Eric Frazier

“It’s smart because these industries have so much competition – good portrait photography is one way you can show potential clients – and even future employees – how very friendly/clever/creative/helpful/easy to work with/smart your team is.” In a world of tight competition for business and talent alike, a positive company culture has become invaluable.

A woman sits up smiling on a modern couch; portrait photography by Eric Frazier
The feet of the woman in the previous photograph – she is up on her tiptoes in cream colored brogues; portrait photography by Eric Frazier

In addition to saving companies from the stiff, boring headshot, Eric also shoots compelling sports and lifestyle photography, recently working with San Francisco Opera and MUFG Union Bank. You can see more of his work here.

A man in a boat throws a fishing net out to sea; portrait and lifestyle photography by Eric Frazier

 

 

Shane Johnson’s Superpower
is Character Design

A black and white illustration of a superhero flying toward the viewer, fist raised; character design by Shane Johnson

If you grew up on comic books like Illustrator Shane Johnson did, you won’t be surprised by his approach to character design. “Superheroes are so compelling because they reflect our own hopes and flaws, on a magnified scale.”

Illustrated black and white portrait of a superhero in mask and cape; character design by Shane Johnson

Shane has lent his comic style to commercial and editorial illustrations for clients from Nickelodeon to Dreamworks, Smithsonian Magazine to the Wall Street Journal. And while he may not always draw literal superheroes, that classic raw energy and the dynamic struggle between good and evil is frequently the subtext of his work.

Comic-style black and white illustration of a fist punching through a wall; character design by Shane Johnson

His latest series, created in black and white with a strong noir feel, was inspired by 1930s comics. “I’m a big fan of older films and radio shows and the original Bob Kane Batman,” says Shane. “I’ve always wanted to create something that harkens back to that, but I needed it to be in my own style.”

“Superheroes reflect our own hopes and flaws…
on a magnified scale”

Per his usual process, he began with rough thumbnails, gathering reference materials once he decided on the layout. “I sometimes even shoot photos of myself for the character poses,” Shane explains. “Or, for more extreme poses, I create models on the computer using Poser Pro.” Shane’s next step is pencils, which are scanned and then inked and shaded in Manga Studio.

Black and white illustration of a superhero facing off against a villain with a gun; character design by Shane Johnson

Shane continuously revises each of his illustrations over several days, always finding “just one more detail” he wants to perfect. It’s the kind of self-improvement his own favorite comic hero, Spider Man, would applaud. Come check out more of Shane’s character design and heroic artwork here.

 

 

Always a winner:
Athlete Photos by Jack Hutch

A female boxer looks directly into camera as she rests on the ropes; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

Jack Hutch has spent decades shooting athlete photos of everyone from Jerry Rice to Spud Webb, Kristi Yamaguchi to Joe Montana and hundreds more, so he doesn’t get nervous around high profile personalities anymore. But he still gets a thrill. “Sports photography is just one of the most exciting things to shoot. You’ve got these bodies at their best, doing things they’ve perfected – If you bring your best, you’re going to get something great,” he says.

Brandi Chastain jumps up to kick an airborne soccer ball near the goal line; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

To bring his best, Jack prepares often and early. “Never once in my career has any athlete given me the amount of time I was promised by the agent. If they tell me ‘an hour,’ I think ‘12 minutes.’ Jack heads to set hours before the athlete arrives and sets up multiple shots, various lighting, wardrobe changes and props. “So when the athlete gets there it’s just bam-bam-bam, switch, bam-bam-bam…and we got it.”

A shirtless portrait of Jerry Rice holding a golf club; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

This training has served him well with another time-pressed population he’s often called to photograph – Silicon Valley CEOs. But with subjects who aren’t as accustomed to being in front of the camera, he sometimes has to slow down.

Black and white shot of a female boxer working out against a punching bag; athlete photos by Jack Hutch
Olympic Skeet Shooter Ali Chiang points her gun; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

“Very accomplished athletes who aren’t super famous may not be as comfortable,” says Jack. “But they all know how to get in the zone. I lay a scene for them: ‘You’re in the semi-finals of the Olympic trials. You walk up to the blocks, you get prepared.’ Immediately, they’re in it.’ Then it’s up to me. Do I want to go low to show the clothing movement as they take off from the blocks? Or from up high, looking down on the lines of the track for a graphic look as they stretch?”

A javelin thrower is poised to throw; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

Jack also considers the exact way their bodies will move as he shoots, taking into account which hand might come up first, which hip is coming around or what the follow through looks like. He times his lighting against all these variables to get the shot he wants.

A biking team poses together under a clouded blue sky; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

“Being an athlete and shooting athletics works together,” says Jack. “You can get the essence of the shot because you understand it.” Jack grew up playing a wide range of sports, starting with ice hockey and evolving to include golf, quarterback of his football team, and butterfly swimming and hockey at the college level. He still plays sports when he can and coaches his son’s hockey team. “When you know how the body works, how the action works, you can get the shot.”

An athlete jumps to catch a frisbee; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

What he can’t always control is the restrictions on the athlete. “Everyone gets approval now,” Jack says. “The athlete is under contract, so the sponsor, the agent, the PR firm – they all have rules about what the athlete can’t do. It can get really limiting. But I like a challenge,” he laughs.

Close up on Willie Mays’ hands holding a baseball; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

That challenge forces him to continually think outside the box, reinventing athlete portraiture when necessary. A portrait of Willie Mays, for instance, became a black and white shot of just Willie’s hands holding the ball. “With these one-of-a-kind athletes you have a chance to create something that will speak to their legacy. Those old, beaten up hands – that’s the history of baseball right there.”

The Heath brothers pose on the track; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

In addition to athlete photos, Jack has also amassed an impressive body of work in lifestyle, industry and architecture photography. Based in San Francisco, he shoots both locally and on location from his fully-equipped Mobile Studio. You can see more of Jack’s work here.

Black and white shot of a neighborhood basketball game in action; athlete photos by Jack Hutch

 

 

Lifestyle Photography that isn’t cheesy? Must be Jordan Reeder.

A boy and his Grandfather look at a laptop together; Lifestyle Photography by Jordan Reeder

We’ve all seen it – the unnaturally ecstatic family unnaturally arranged around an unnaturally perfect picnic blanket/camp fire/breakfast table – you know, the typical lifestyle photography that isn’t anyone’s actual lifestyle. Luckily, Jordan Reeder is out to change all that.

A woman takes plates out of a cabinet in a sun-filled white kitchen; Lifestyle Photography by Jordan Reeder

“Everything has to come together,” says Jordan of his lifestyle approach. “The end product has to look natural, not orchestrated. Having a live casting helps you find people who can comfortably interact together, and having a real location helps those people act naturally. Plus I try to make wisecracks to loosen them up – maybe they’re laughing at me? But …whatever works!”

“Maybe they’re laughing at me?
But…whatever works!”

Jordan’s ‘keep it natural’ philosophy extends to his on-set lighting as well. “The lighting plays a big role, so I’m very hands on. But I’m not a fan of making things complicated when they don’t need to be. I’ll always check for ambient light during scouting and try to go all-natural when we can. I spend a lot of time in the studio with complex light setups – so when I’m not in the studio I crave natural light!”

A couple smiles in the sunlight, looking off-camera; Lifestyle Photography by Jordan Reeder

Well known for his corporate and tech product and people photography, Jordan has been adding more and more lifestyle work to his portfolio at his clients’ requests. His most recent shoot was for a large pharmaceutical company, providing shots for a stock library, website, brochures and social media.

A woman picks vegetables in her garden while her grown son holds a basket; Lifestyle Photography by Jordan Reeder

“It was a great shoot and the client approved a really good cast. We had a little trouble getting the young boy to engage with his “grandpa” in a scene with a laptop, but once I figured out how to stream old Star Wars commercials, we were back in business,” laughs Jordan.

Overhead shot of a family doing a puzzle together on a rustic wooden table; Lifestyle Photography by Jordan Reeder

Jordan also recently wrapped a lifestyle and product shoot for global technology company Le Eco. You can check out that new work and much more here.

A man speaks into a remote; Lifestyle Photography by Jordan Reeder
The Le Eco Smart TV, Product and Lifestyle Photography by Jordan Reeder

 

 

Nader Khouri turns up the heat on food photography

The Hestan Cue Smart Cooking System in action, food photography by Nader Khouri The Hestan Cue Smart Cooking System in action

Nader Khouri is well known for his dynamic food photography – and now he’s making pots and pans look fabulous, too. Hestan, a high quality cookware company, contacted Nader last year and they’ve been making beautiful photos together ever since.

The Hestan Cue Pan and app side by side, with scallops sautéing; food photography by Nader Khouri Nader shoots the Hestan pans and app in use as well as ingredients and final dishes.

The company was prepping to launch their new Hestan Cue Smart Cooking System – a sensor enabled induction burner and sauté pan that connect to your smart device via Bluetooth. “It was a tall order,” says Nader. “They needed 200 recipes photographed for the app, plus ingredient shots – it meant shooting on a weekly basis.”

A hand spritzes lime over shrimp tacos; food photography by Nader Khouri One of Nader’s 200+ recipe shots for the Hestan Cue App

Nader jumped at the chance to partner with Chef Phil Tessier – former Executive Sous Chef at The French Laundry – and his talented team, shooting amazing recipes in a Napa barn every week. “We make each other look good,” says Nader. “When you know how to use light, you make a chef look good. When you plate food well, the photographer looks good.”

A Nanobond pan on a marble counter surrounded by ingredients including eggs and figs; food photography by Nader Khouri Nader gets just the right angle to minimize reflection off the pans.

Shooting the pans, however, is a whole different challenge. “They’re so reflective of light,” Nader explains. “I have to be really conscientious or the whole thing turns to a bright, messy reflection. Usually I light for the food and focus on positioning the light. Everything depends on the angle I shoot.”

A hand holds a Nanobond pot, pouring pea soup into a ceramic bowl; food photography by Nader Khouri Nader has added sister-brand, NanoBond, to his client roster as well.

He must be doing something right. Shortly into his project with Hestan Cue, they introduced him to sister cookware line NanoBond and he’s since done two shoots for them as well. “The second shoot was super exciting because we showcased the kitchen of Chef Corey Lee at his three Michelin-starred restaurant Benu, stocked with NanoBond. Obviously, Chef Corey does his own food styling,” laughs Nader.

Dumplings in a Nanobond pan, surrounded by ingredients on a dark counter; food photography by Nader Khouri The NanoBond looks even better with Chef Corey Lee’s food in it.

Outside of Hestan, Nader continues to shoot food photography and lifestyle projects, always inspired by his personal mission to promote eating and living well. You can see more of his cravings-worthy work here.

White fish fillet in a white dish, with sauce being poured over it from a small white pitcher; food photography by Nader Khouri Nader’s inspiration is sharing his passion for eating and living well.

 

 

Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett is down with dirty.

A fiery coke battery for Indianapolis’ Community Hospital, by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett Coke Battery shot in Indianapolis for Community Hospital

Industrial photographer Patrick Bennett has chased trains through the desert, industrial riverboats through Peru and arctic transport trucks through Alaska, all to get the perfectly gritty or glam shot. Wait – glam industrial shots? Yep. “There’s something about taking what most people view as dirty or don’t even really see at all and making it a thing of beauty,” says Patrick.

Dawn along the Seattle waterfront, by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett Dawn on the Seattle waterfront.

When faced with subject matter most of us ignore, Patrick finds the extremes, embracing the grit, the power and the industrial landscapes he frequents. “I’ll look for a sense of scale,” he says, “making machinery look small in the environment when it’s actually quite large. Or highlighting the machine’s design while it’s working. Or even using dirt or wood chips flying to enhance its beauty.”

A mechanic at work for Speedco, by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett Shot in Franklin, KY for Speedco.

Patrick has enough industrial photography under his belt to know what works best in the field. Wide angles and long lenses are his go-tos. “My Canon 500mm is great for extremes – I haul that baby all over the place,” he says. “It creates a compression when shooting into sunrise or sunset that allows me to share something not many viewers can grasp, but often makes them gasp.”

Close up, wide-angle shot of the gleaming headlight of a Speedco truck, by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett A Speedco truck headlight gets the Patrick Bennett treatment. Shot in Denver, CO

His other frequent partner is his Canon 11-24mm. “I shot the truck light for Speedco at 22mm, or I could shoot it at 11mm because it’s a rectilinear lens. You have to be careful though – it can look funky if you don’t use it right.”

A mechanic at work on a big red semi truck, for Speedco, by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett Shot in Whiteland, IN for Speedco

If it seems Patrick has an unusually personal attachment to his equipment, it’s because it’s often just him and his kit out on the road. “I like traveling alone unless I really need a crew. There are people working wherever I go, and whether or not we speak the same language there’s the mutual curiosity of our respective careers, so I get some interaction,” he says. “Everybody’s a photographer now but when they see what I create on the back of the camera it brings a respect that often opens the door to more opportunity.”

A train rolls through the hills of Trinidad, WA, for BNSF Railway by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett Shot at Trinidad, WA for BNSF Railway

Asked about a favorite shoot, Patrick describes one most of us would actively avoid. “I was in the oil fields outside Deadhorse, Alaska photographing these transport vehicles called rolligons. They travel over the frozen tundra, delivering supplies using huge balloon tires that hold just 20 psi so they don’t damage the fragile ecosystem. They max out around 14mph and have bibs under them to catch any stray oil droplet. I was blown away by the measures they take to protect the environment.”

A specialized transport vehicle called a rolligon rolls across Alaska. Shot for Twin Disc by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett A specialized transport vehicle called a rolligon rolls across Alaska. Shot for Twin Disc.

“It was 18 degrees below zero at the warmest. While I was waiting I saw movement out of the corner of my eye and it turned out to be an arctic fox. It ran back and forth approaching until it got close enough to bite the leg of my tripod, then took off in search of something a little more palatable. But I got a great shot of the rolligon rolling out across the frozen tundra, the sun setting behind it.”

Shot of a mechanic at work on a VW Bug, with his loyal dog standing by. Shot for Essentia by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett Mechanic, shot for Essentia Water

Patrick is already back out on the road, scouting port shots for Mediterranean Shipping Company. “I’ll be shooting offloading from a ship and the logistics of loading containers onto an intermodal BNSF train, then chasing it across southern California getting images of the 2-mile long train.” Patrick is also continuously shooting for ongoing client Essentia Water. Keep an eye out for his next work – you’ll likely never catch Patrick sitting still.

A woman rides a motorcycle in front of a gritty urban wall covered with posters, by Industrial Photographer Patrick Bennett Patrick’s work for Essentia water encompasses athletes to city streets

 

 

For Filip Yip, character design is kid games.

An illustrated boy holds a chocolate drink, smiling; character design by Filip Yip

Over his long, varied career, Filip Yip has truly mastered character design, creating hundreds, even thousands of iconic people, animals and magical creatures for all types of brands. But for all his experience, what gave him the biggest boost of design confidence was becoming a father. “For children’s characters, now at least I know what my kids like. I have a starting point,” he laughs.

A sweet graphic of a tooth fairy for Aquafresh; character design by Filip Yip A fairy that teaches good dental hygiene to kids, for Aquafresh

Filip has designed characters for all genres and target audiences, but reaching young audiences – and the parents who buy them stuff – has become both a specialty and a special delight for him. “We start by really imagining who this kid is, how old, what she likes to play, does she have siblings, what’s her culture. Sometimes I use a loose line and imperfect proportions to denote childlike behavior. Other times it’s clean lines but vibrant colors,” he says.

A character design series of kids in Halloween costumes for Clif Kids, by Filip Yip
A character design series of kids in Halloween costumes for Clif Kids, by Filip Yip
A character design series of kids in Halloween costumes for Clif Kids, by Filip Yip
A Halloween promotion for Clif Kids called for costumed characters

A recent project for Clif Kids required Filip to interpret limited edition Halloween flavors through the costumes and attitudes of the characters. “We’ve evolved their character design over time,” says Filip. “It’s less polished – more free spirited now.” But a similar assignment for Juicy Juice took the opposite approach with clean lines and bubbly characters and elements, in line with their design strategy and architecture.

Character and package design for a Halloween limited edition package for Juicy Juice, by Filip Yip Juicy Juice stays true to their bright colors and bubbly shapes.

Sometimes, a character takes on a life of its own. Filip’s character for Frigo cheese provided the basis for the logo and then evolved into an active, fun-loving Cheesehead who’s been spotted playing sports, going to school, and even decorating a Christmas tree.

The Frigo Cheese logo, including the Frigo Cheesehead; character design by Filip Yip The logo evolved into a character of much greater dimension.

“We developed his whole universe – anatomy, his super powers, his circle of friends – and we express them in different channels. So the more products consumers purchase, the more they learn about him,” says Filip. The launch of the campaign has seen sales track higher, and one of the packaging systems won a national design award.

The Frigo Cheesehead at a school desk, throwing a baseball, dressed as a pirate and waving the American flag; character design by Filip Yip
The Frigo Cheesehead at a school desk, throwing a baseball, dressed as a pirate and waving the American flag; character design by Filip Yip
The Frigo Cheesehead at a school desk, throwing a baseball, dressed as a pirate and waving the American flag; character design by Filip Yip
The Frigo Cheesehead at a school desk, throwing a baseball, dressed as a pirate and waving the American flag; character design by Filip Yip
Filip’s Frigo Cheesehead in action

Filip is trained in both design and advertising, so he can see the big picture goals while executing in detail. For some clients he offers strategic guidance through the creative process, while other clients come in with a strong vision that Filip expertly executes. But his proudest achievement in character design is a young sailor who’s older than Filip himself.

An update of the classic Cracker Jack sailor boy; character design by Filip Yip An icon since 1896, Filip gave Cracker Jack an update

“Cracker Jack is a beloved mascot – it’s a centuries old icon – and it had only been updated three times before my version. After many explorations and focus groups, the result is the sweet Jack the team and I had in our minds the whole time. I’m quite attached to him. And I secretly gave Bingo, his dog, the essence of two beloved dogs of mine, which makes it all the better,” says Filip.

An illustrated Frankenstein for a Halloween limited edition package for Juicy Juice, by Filip Yip A very friendly Frankenstein for Juicy Juice

Next up for Filip is a much more grown up venture – assets for a very edgy brand to be released this month. “It’s irreverent, risky, risqué and a lot of fun,” he says. “You’ve got to change things up to stay creative.” Check out more of Filip’s impressive and diverse portfolio here.

   

Still and Motion Photographer Eric Frazier just can’t stay still.

A Day in the Bay for Deloitte, by Still & Motion Photographer Eric Frazier

After working on movies and shooting several commercials out of film school, Eric Frazier turned his career focus to lifestyle and sport photography. But the film world just wouldn’t let him be. “I added motion to my portfolio because clients kept asking for it,” the still and motion photographer says, “and it just grew from there.”

For budding motion photographers, or still shooters yearning to switch, Eric recommends getting involved in the editing process early on. “That’s where you learn the most,” he says. “Editing your own footage quickly makes it clear what you’re missing or did wrong. Planning each shot from framing to blocking is very important.”

 

“Winging it will always lead to reshoots.”

 

Eric points out that there’s less room for error with motion photography as well. With still photos, little things can be fixed in photoshop. But with motion, “those little changes will blow a big FX budget, so each take has to be clean.”

With Apple, Deloitte and Union Bank on his client list, Eric has shot social media content, video tutorials, in-house videos and countless other applications. “Motion can be used everywhere these days,” he says, “so the demand is skyrocketing.”

Clients often ask Eric to cover stills and motion in the same shoot. “That’s tricky,” he says. “You can’t record sound while shooting stills, so I’ll have a DP shoot b-roll while I shoot stills, then I’ll take over to direct the talent and get video with sound. It takes a good crew to pull it off, but it really does reduce costs and logistics for clients.

Next up for Eric are several still shoots including a portrait job for a current client. And he’s developing a personal video project as well, because “You gotta keep the creativity flowing!”